"Achieving optimal outcomes for Australian wildlife"

Volunteer Strategy

Strategy for the volunteer wildlife rehabilitation sector

The NSW Wildlife Council management team urges all member groups to prioritise making all their volunteers aware of the NSW Government Wildlife Rehabilitation Sector Strategy and inviting individual comment either to their group, or by their group to NWC for a combined submission to OEH NPWS.

This strategy has been several years in the making however stakeholders have been afforded only a very short time for comment on the final document.

The public consultation period ends on 12 April. If any individual NWC group wishes to provide comment for inclusion in a joint NWC submission the details would need to be at NWC’s email, secretary@nwc.org.au no later than Monday 1 April 2019.

NOTE: if clicking on the link doesn’t open your email program, right click on the link and select copy email address,

Read the strategy and supporting documents and let us know your views about the review findings, recommendations and proposed accreditation system.

A support document to the NSW Volunteer Wildlife Rehabilitation Sector Strategy 2019–2022

Accreditation of volunteer wildlife rescue and rehabilitation service providers in NSW

A support document to the NSW Volunteer Wildlife Rehabilitation Sector Strategy 2019–2022

Link to OEH Webpage


NSW Volunteer Wildlife Rehabilitation Sector Strategy Consultation Draft

NSW Volunteer Wildlife Rehabilitation Sector Strategy Consultation Draft

The NSW Volunteer Wildlife Rehabilitation Sector Strategy is a three year plan to support and improve wildlife rehabilitation in New South Wales.

Link to OEH Webpage


Volunteer wildlife rehabilitators and veterinary practitioners make a valuable contribution to our community.

Review of the NSW Volunteer Wildlife Rehabilitation Sector

An evidence base for guiding future reform

Volunteer wildlife rehabilitators and veterinary practitioners make a valuable contribution to our community.

Link to OEH Webpage


Support document – Wildlife rehabilitator compliance audit

Wildlife rehabilitator provider compliance audit

This project reports on an independent compliance audit of NSW wildlife rehabilitators undertaken on behalf of National Parks and Wildlife.

Link to OEH Webpage

Q fever factsheet

Q fever is a bacterial infection that can cause a severe flu-like illness. For some people, Q fever can affect their health and ability to work for many years. The bacteria are spread from animals, mainly cattle, sheep and goats. Even people who do not have contact with animals may be infected. A safe and effective vaccine is available to protect people who are at risk. Screening is required to identify who can be vaccinated.

What is Q fever?

Q fever is a disease caused by the bacterium Coxiella burnetii. It is spread to humans from cattle, sheep and goats and a range of other domestic and wild animals. Even people who do not have contact with animals may be infected. (more…)

Landmark legal win for climate and community

Chief Justice of the Land and Environment Court Brian Preston SC handed down his judgment today in a landmark case, refusing approval of a new coal mine to be built just outside of the town of Gloucester in the NSW Upper Hunter Valley.

This is the first time an Australian court has refused consent for a coal mine on the basis of its climate change impacts.

Read the full press release and links to the case here: https://www.edonsw.org.au/gloucester_climate_win?utm_source=eBulletin+list+June+2018&utm_campaign=f265c39d6d-ebull12Feb2019&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_0aa74baca5-f265c39d6d-115165

Most Unwanted Wildlife

Help protect our environment, economy and communities from the ‘Most Unwanted’ illegal non-native animals

NSW Department of Primary Industries is pleased to officially launch the ‘Most Unwanted’ campaign to encourage the people of NSW be on the lookout for and report non-native pest animal incursions in NSW.

The ‘Most Unwanted’ can cause significant damage to NSW by disrupting ecosystems, introducing diseases,  preying on and competing with our native animals for limited resources. Illegal trade of exotic wildlife often leads to animal cruelty and death.

The NSW Government is working with the people of NSW to prevent new pest species establishing in the state and we need your help to protect our environment, economy and communities from non-native animals that have the potential to damage our natural environment and industries

  • Non-native animals don’t belong in NSW because they may
    • prey on native animals
    • compete with native animals for food and shelter
    • destroy natural habitats
    • introduce and spread exotic diseases.
  • Help stop these species calling NSW home by:
    • reporting unusual non-native animals to NSW DPI when you see them
    • reporting the illegal keeping of non-native animals
    • never releasing an animal you have kept as a pet into the wild
  • Your actions could help to protect the NSW environment, economy and your local community from the negative impacts of introduced pest animals
  • If you see an unusual non-native pest animal, report it to NSW DPI by calling 1800 680 244 or reporting online at www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/biosecurity/sighting

Proposals to Keep Native Animals as Pets in NSW

The NSW Wildlife Council (NWC), on behalf of its 25 licensed volunteer wildlife groups, has provided its submission to the recent NSW Government discussion paper “Towards a risk-based approach to wildlife licences under the Biodiversity Conservation Act 2016”.

The NWC is aware that other submissions to the discussion paper put forward to the NSW government proposed 37 native mammal species that could be kept as pets; wombats, kangaroos, gliders, possums, quolls and wallabies are just 6 of the suggested 37 species.  

The NWC does not support any expansion of the keeping of native animals as pets and especially changes that would consider including threatened species.

In its Keeping Native Animals as Pets submission NWC said in part:

It is an acknowledged part of human nature that many people wish to confine native animals in a captive situation for their own personal pleasure with little or no consideration given to conservation of any particular species – simply to have and to hold, to interact with, to look at and own.

Since the advent of the wildlife licensing systems under the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974, there have been a number of concerted attempts by lobbyists to relax regulations in NSW to permit the holding of an increased number of mammal species as pets.

The rehabilitation sector has vigorously opposed this lobbying from the standpoint that on conservation and animal welfare grounds native animals should be free-living species, in their endemic habitat in appropriate family structures where they can exhibit natural behaviours and normal mating practices. 


We are collaborating with key partners on this campaign, and to read more about the complex issues of this proposal visit www.wild4life.org.au and www.wildforlife.org.au to find out why this is such an important issue right now which needs your attention and action.

The Submission in full can be found here:  https://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/-/media/OEH/Corporate-Site/Documents/Licences-and-permits/reforms-submissions-organisations-nsw-wildlife-council.pdf?la=en&hash=8E0E3E50CD469C5CE4A7F4818DBBA61E164528F9

Birdlife Australia November 2018 e-news

CTRL Click or hold down finger on link to view in a new page.

2018 NWC Grant Winners

The 2018 NWC grant winners were announced at the 2018 NWC AGM.

The winners are:

Name Group Grant Summary Grant Amount
Kerstin Schweth Wildlife Rescue South Coast 9m x 7m x 1.5m enclosure for housing rehabilitating wombats and koalas $2,000.00
Diane Hinton Wildcare Queanbeyan 7m x 4m x 4m Raptor aviary extension $2,000.00
Julie Reid Friends of the Koala Vetarie T50M intensive care unit and humidifier for koala joeys $2,000.00
Jacqueline O’Neill ORCCA Surveillance drone for marine mammals $2,000.00
Christine Nolan FAWNA Macropod pre and release enclosure $1,911.00
2018 Total Grant amounts $9,911.00

ORRCA’s Annual Census

ORRCA's Census Day

Click here to find out more information

Members and Friends, this is your Invitation to:

The 2018 ORRCA Humpback Whale Migration Census

It’s a great day out. Simply pick your favourite headland and call or email the hotline to register your location so we know where you will be. Make sure you print off some ORRCA sighting log sheets from our website.

Then on the day, pack a picnic and your supplies; Binoculars, camera, a pen/pencil for recording details, a chair/rug to sit on, warm waterproof clothes and off you go and enjoy the sights that unfold in this great whale migration.

Remember to record your sightings!