NWC – NSW Wildlife Council

Monthly Archive: August 2015

Threatened Species Day

Despite the efforts of so many passionate conservationists, national Threatened Species Day (September 7) passes unnoticed by many Australians, although recent surveys show that Australians are more concerned than ever about our impact on the environment. Each year on Threatened Species Day, the BRINK initiative brings together an alliance of respected conservation organisations to speak with one voice on the importance of decisive action to conserve Australia’s threatened species. Last year around 30 conservation organisations with over two hundred thousand supporters participated in the Brink .
In an effort to raise the profile of all threatened species, we focus on one flagship species each year.

This year, the focus is on the critically endangered Northern Hairy Nosed Wombat.

In an effort to raise the profile of all threatened species, The Brink focuses on one flagship species each year. This year, the focus is on the critically endangered Northern Hairy Nosed Wombat.

In an effort to raise the profile of all threatened species, The Brink focuses on one flagship species each year. This year, the focus is on the critically endangered Northern Hairy Nosed Wombat.

ABOUT THE NORTHERN HAIRY-NOSED WOMBAT

The Northern hairy-nosed wombat (NHW) is the largest of the three wombat species weighing up to 40Kg. They were once widespread, across eastern Australia, but today, they are found in only two locations: Epping Forest National Park in Central Queensland and in the Richard Underwood Nature Refuge near St George, Queensland. For more information, see the Wombat Foundation website.

The most effective thing we can do to help the Northern Hairy-nosed wombat is to contact the Australian and Queensland Environment ministers, let them know about our concern, and ask them to help in ways that support the latest recovery plan for the Northern Hairy-nosed wombat. See The Brinks website for a letter guide and also other ways that you might be able to help the Northern Hairy Nosed Wombat.

New species of glider found

Researchers in the Northern Territory believe they have found a new marsupial species, and the process of identifying it could take them all the way to the British Museum.

The undescribed species of glider was first captured for analysis in the Northern Territory by researchers at Charles Darwin University, and is an animal Australia knows little about.

“We made our first sighting in Kakadu in October 2013,” said Professor Sue Carthew, lead researcher on the Northern Glider Project.

“It used to be thought sugar gliders occurred across the Top End, all along the Eastern Seaboard and New Guinea. But we have genotyped gliders from a whole range of areas and found that the northern Australian gliders are quite different.”

Gliders have been known to exist in the Northern Territory since the 1800s, but few studies have ever been conducted on the furry creatures, making Professor Carthew’s study the first of its kind.

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/environment/conservation/new-species-of-glider-discovered-in-the-northern-territory-20150812-gixnym.html